Georgia hospitals look at $32 million malpractice case

Representing Atlanta, Savannah, Columbus, Decatur, Augusta & nearby areas of Georgia

 

Doctors, nurses and staff do a service to the community through their dedication, years of study and passion for excellence. Unfortunately, sometimes staff or hospitals commit errors that can have deadly repercussions. This is especially true in pediatric care where a poor decision can have a long-term effect on a baby. A simple surgical error can lead to significant brain damage. Medical malpractice is something hospitals take seriously.

Georgia hospitals may look in the future to a precedent set by a Pennsylvania medical malpractice suit where a jury awarded $32.8 million to a girl born with brain damage. The jury found that two nurses who attended the mother committed negligence by failing to report erratic biometrics to a doctor. There was a sudden change in the baby's heart rate that the nurses failed to report for over 13 minutes. The alleged cause of the heart rate drop was lack of oxygen, which may have caused massive brain damage. The baby girl suffers spasms in her legs, has difficulty controlling her neck and trouble walking.

Georgia has strict laws on the rights of medical malpractice victims. It's important to be well-informed of the law. In a medical malpractice case, proving fault can be difficult and onerous. A birth injury can have many factors including the conduct of various parties such as doctors, nurses, pharmaceutical companies, specialists and others. A hospital can be held liable for its negligence.

Families who have fallen victim to medical malpractice may be able to receive financial compensation for something that could have been preventable. The compensation can be used for future medical treatment needed because of the injury. Holding the negligent party accountable also may help put pressure on hospitals to prevent avoidable accidents.

Source: Daily Times, "Jury gives $32.M to girl in Chesco medical malpractice case," Michael P. Rellahan, Jan. 22, 2014

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