Head Injuries in Children Need to Be Taken Seriously

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Head injuries are not something to take lightly. The CDC estimates that 1.7 million people in the country sustain a traumatic brain injury every year, and these injuries contribute to a third of all injury-related deaths in the United States. Children, specifically those between the ages of 0 and 4 and the ages of 15 and 19, are the most likely to sustain these injuries, which is why further education about head injuries is so important.

Most parents would do all they can to protect their children, yet many do not do enough to protect against head injuries. Because of the long-term effects that head injuries can have, parents should learn all they can about this common childhood injury.

In children, head injuries often occur when they are playing. Falls on the sports field or ice rink, tumbles while riding a bike and falls while climbing outdoors are all common causes. For this reason, children need to wear protective helmets whenever possible. Parents need to ensure that helmets are being used when their children participate in rough sports events or when riding wheeled toys, such as bikes, scooters and roller skates.

Head injuries can also occur in car accidents, especially when children are not properly restrained. Proper use of child safety seats can help protect children against serious brain injury in a car accident.

What makes head injuries so scary for many parents is the fact that they cannot see what is going on inside their child's head. What may appear to be a minor fall and bump could actually be a skull fracture or serious brain injury. Even repeat concussions can have long-term effects on the brain.

This is why all head injuries should be checked by a qualified medical practitioner, just to rule out any long-term effects. If the injury was caused by another individual, parents should also consider talking to a lawyer about any further steps they need to take to protect their child's rights.

Source: WPRI.com, "Important facts about child head trauma," Courtney Caligiuri, July 16, 2012