Over 400,000 Fords and Lincolns found to be defective products

Representing Atlanta, Savannah, Columbus, Decatur, Augusta & nearby areas of Georgia

 

Atlanta residents expect their cars, especially new ones, to be as safe as possible. That is why when a company recalls over 465,000 vehicles because they are considered defective products, it raises a few eyebrows.

Ford has recently recalled 465,000 2013 Ford and Lincoln vehicles because of a fuel leak that apparently poses a fire risk. Though no fires have been reported yet, there have been at least 600 complaints made about the problem since the end of March. The vehicles that are included in this recall include the Ford Explorer, Taurus, Flex, Fusion, Interceptor Sedan, Interceptor Utility Vehicle, Lincoln MKS, MKT and MKZ.

In addition to this larger warning, Ford also announced a recall for the Lincoln MKZ and for the Ford Fusion. The MKZ has 500 vehicles that have insulation on the engine block that could crack at "extremely" low temperatures. The Fusion has 25 vehicles that could suffer impaired driving or loss of steering control because of a missing "internal retaining chip".

Often times a defective product is not caught immediately by the company responsible, and, even when it is, the company will often deny that the problem stems from something they did. For this reason, if a loved one is lost or injured because of a defective product, the responsible party may initially deny responsibility. It is often necessary to bring a product liability lawsuit. Through the lawsuit, the responsible party can be found, and the party who suffered the loss can be properly compensated. Often the discovery process to deduce the responsible party can be long and costly, and, as such, the responsible party often has an incentive to settle.

Recovering from the loss of a loved one is always a difficult task, no matter how that loss was caused. Getting help is often a necessary step in the recovery process.

Source: CNN Money, "Ford recalling 465K cars for fuel leak," Chris Isidore, June 3, 2013.

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