Semi-truck crash leaves Georgia motorist in critical condition

Representing Atlanta, Savannah, Columbus, Decatur, Augusta & nearby areas of Georgia

 

No motorist enjoys heavy traffic, but people living in and around Atlanta know this better than most. Rush hour traffic is normally dense and hectic in the metro area, but add a semi-truck accident to the mix and the result can be serious injury or death and a monstrous traffic jam.

Recently the westbound lanes of a Georgia highway were closed after a serious truck accident sent one motorist to the hospital. An eastbound semi-truck was turning left onto a local road at the intersection when a westbound car collided into the rear of the tractor-trailer. The car ended up wedged under the trailer.

The local fire and rescue squad raised the trailer off the ground with airbags and timbers in order to dislodge the car. The driver, reportedly in critical condition, had to be cut out of the car and was transported to a nearby hospital.

Because there are many possible factors that can cause a semi-truck accident, it's important that victims of such accidents make sure the details of the incident are closely investigated. They can launch an independent inquiry into whether the truck driver was at fault. Some of the things that help determine fault include whether the truck driver was speeding or tailgating, whether the truck was properly maintained or if the driver was fatigued or distracted.

Tractor-trailer trucks are heavier and bigger than most other vehicles on the road. This simple fact is the reason why semi-truck accidents result in serious and oftentimes devastating injuries. If this happens, it's important that accident victims receive necessary compensation to help cover medical expenses, lost wages and any other costs associated with the accident. Seeking the right advice can help Atlanta-based accident victims understand their rights and responsibilities.

Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "Injury crash shuts down 316 in Gwinnett," Mike Morris and John Spink, Sep. 27, 2012